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The spot for the good news, the good word, the quick reports of the many, many wonderful news items I hear all the time and want to share with the rest of you. Expect to find the good news when you come to check out "what’s the good word?"

Tuesday, October 25, 2011

Diversion


Monday was my day off, the first one since Thanksgiving. It has been a busy period, with preparation for Mission Centre Conference, the conference itself, meetings with our Apostle, a couple of conference calls, two trips to Buffalo airport, plus meetings this past weekend in London, Owen Sound, St. Thomas, and Barrie. I was beat, and the next few weeks will be just as busy.

Despite that, I found it hard to turn the mind off on Monday morning. Since I was way behind on email, I decided to work for a while to try and catch up a bit. It is an odd paradox that my mind would not disengage, and yet my heart just wasn’t in it. A change of pace was needed.

Some time past noon my son called to see if I could give him some help rebuilding his deck. He doesn’t often ask for help, and since my work often involves weekends, I am often not available when he does. I decided to go, hoping it might help me get my mind off the many church matters that seem so pressing. It would be a welcome change.

For several hours we worked together, pulling nails, removing old deck boards, and figuring out the best way to repair the structure of the deck itself. When my grandsons came home from school, the older one wanted to help, as I knew he would. He became an enthusiastic junior worker pulling bent nails out of old deck boards, under grand-parental supervision of course. Then after supper, there was time to read stories before bedtime (theirs, not mine).

All in all, it has been a lovely day in the fresh air and a nice diversion from work. There was no rain, and even a little sunshine. Now I feel as if I can face the waiting tasks at hand, or at least some of them. This week there is planning to be done, several daytime and evening meetings to attend, and a Temple School course to prepare before next Saturday. A day off has restored some sense of balance to life, and things will be okay.

What do you do for diversion? When life is busy with work and other pressing matters, how do you find a change of pace to recharge your personal batteries? Do you have trouble finding time to do that? How do you make it happen? Will you share your best learned tips with the rest of us?

May you find the necessary time and diversion to restore yourself today.

Posted by Carman

4 comments:

  1. I restore myself every day from the commitments I make with rising early, reading and prayer for the needs of people . Then I take a long walk in the out of doors.After breakfast I am ready to meet the needs of the new day God has given me.
    Have a good day Carman

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  2. Thank you Elizabeth, I also have a morning quiet-time routine. Given the nature of my work, it does not always provide the diversion I need go break the cyle of my thoughts about work. It is highly to be prized, however.
    Carman

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  3. When I get overloaded or frustrated by the lack of results from a brilliant idea I've had or a meaningful worship message I've presented, I return to the story of the sower and remember my place. God will deal with the nature of the soil, my job is to cast the seed. With that in mind, I will attempt to be the best seed caster I can be and leave the rest to Him. I focus on what He's given me to do. If it's met with lethargy or rejection, was it failure on my part or the result of poor soil (for which I am not responsible)? Do the best I can then move on. Where does God want me to focus my time and energy? While not diverting me from the tasks at hand, it reduces the amount of time wasted fussing over issues already dealt with. After all, there are always more entries on the "to do" list.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Good advice, Marilyn. Thank you for sharing.

    Carman

    ReplyDelete